partytimehexcellent:

FEMICOM is a side-project that I quietly released on Friday. Thanks to prostheticknowledge and other folks on tumblr and twitter who have been sharing the site with others. I’m very happy and humbled that the idea behind this project resonates.
prostheticknowledge:

FEMICOM 
New online resource project by Part Time! Hexcellent! [Tumblr Blog] that looks at the female characters that have appeared in the history of video games:

Though the FEMICOM site itself is quite new—(cue the advance apology for any broken links)—the idea behind it has been dear to me for quite some time. As a child of the 1990s, much of my play time was spent with that generation of video games and computers, whether at the mall’s arcade, in the school’s computer lab with its neat array of Macintoshes, or at cousins’ or friends’ houses where we marveled at the amazing graphics of Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and DOOM. And aside from my early obsession with baseball and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, I was also a girly-girl through and through, happy to play with Barbies and fairly insistent on wearing dresses at all times. As I grew older, I found that video game culture and girly culture rarely intersected. Yet, happily, there were places where the two worlds overlapped; these were my favorite play spaces in my teens and beyond.
FEMICOM is a portmanteau that combines the words feminine and computing. It is also a nod to the Japanese video game console called the Nintendo Famicom. FEMICOM is my attempt to document and preserve those special pockets of feminine tech, especially of the 20th century. Tamagotchis and Hello Kitty Game Boys are part of this space, as are web sozai, webrings, software skins, and electronic paper dolls, to name a few. By bringing these electronic artifacts together in a central archive, I hope to encourage comparisons among them and to ask and answer questions about stereotypical gender roles and how they have come to shape modern games and computing experiences. FEMICOM will catalog these items, which are often missing from other video game and software databases, so that they can be easily browsed or searched. Additionally, the site will feature game development resources, interviews, and other relevant content. 

[Bold is my emphasis] 
As I have said earlier, the site is in the early stages of content development, but you can check out here
partytimehexcellent:

FEMICOM is a side-project that I quietly released on Friday. Thanks to prostheticknowledge and other folks on tumblr and twitter who have been sharing the site with others. I’m very happy and humbled that the idea behind this project resonates.
prostheticknowledge:

FEMICOM 
New online resource project by Part Time! Hexcellent! [Tumblr Blog] that looks at the female characters that have appeared in the history of video games:

Though the FEMICOM site itself is quite new—(cue the advance apology for any broken links)—the idea behind it has been dear to me for quite some time. As a child of the 1990s, much of my play time was spent with that generation of video games and computers, whether at the mall’s arcade, in the school’s computer lab with its neat array of Macintoshes, or at cousins’ or friends’ houses where we marveled at the amazing graphics of Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and DOOM. And aside from my early obsession with baseball and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, I was also a girly-girl through and through, happy to play with Barbies and fairly insistent on wearing dresses at all times. As I grew older, I found that video game culture and girly culture rarely intersected. Yet, happily, there were places where the two worlds overlapped; these were my favorite play spaces in my teens and beyond.
FEMICOM is a portmanteau that combines the words feminine and computing. It is also a nod to the Japanese video game console called the Nintendo Famicom. FEMICOM is my attempt to document and preserve those special pockets of feminine tech, especially of the 20th century. Tamagotchis and Hello Kitty Game Boys are part of this space, as are web sozai, webrings, software skins, and electronic paper dolls, to name a few. By bringing these electronic artifacts together in a central archive, I hope to encourage comparisons among them and to ask and answer questions about stereotypical gender roles and how they have come to shape modern games and computing experiences. FEMICOM will catalog these items, which are often missing from other video game and software databases, so that they can be easily browsed or searched. Additionally, the site will feature game development resources, interviews, and other relevant content. 

[Bold is my emphasis] 
As I have said earlier, the site is in the early stages of content development, but you can check out here
partytimehexcellent:

FEMICOM is a side-project that I quietly released on Friday. Thanks to prostheticknowledge and other folks on tumblr and twitter who have been sharing the site with others. I’m very happy and humbled that the idea behind this project resonates.
prostheticknowledge:

FEMICOM 
New online resource project by Part Time! Hexcellent! [Tumblr Blog] that looks at the female characters that have appeared in the history of video games:

Though the FEMICOM site itself is quite new—(cue the advance apology for any broken links)—the idea behind it has been dear to me for quite some time. As a child of the 1990s, much of my play time was spent with that generation of video games and computers, whether at the mall’s arcade, in the school’s computer lab with its neat array of Macintoshes, or at cousins’ or friends’ houses where we marveled at the amazing graphics of Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and DOOM. And aside from my early obsession with baseball and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, I was also a girly-girl through and through, happy to play with Barbies and fairly insistent on wearing dresses at all times. As I grew older, I found that video game culture and girly culture rarely intersected. Yet, happily, there were places where the two worlds overlapped; these were my favorite play spaces in my teens and beyond.
FEMICOM is a portmanteau that combines the words feminine and computing. It is also a nod to the Japanese video game console called the Nintendo Famicom. FEMICOM is my attempt to document and preserve those special pockets of feminine tech, especially of the 20th century. Tamagotchis and Hello Kitty Game Boys are part of this space, as are web sozai, webrings, software skins, and electronic paper dolls, to name a few. By bringing these electronic artifacts together in a central archive, I hope to encourage comparisons among them and to ask and answer questions about stereotypical gender roles and how they have come to shape modern games and computing experiences. FEMICOM will catalog these items, which are often missing from other video game and software databases, so that they can be easily browsed or searched. Additionally, the site will feature game development resources, interviews, and other relevant content. 

[Bold is my emphasis] 
As I have said earlier, the site is in the early stages of content development, but you can check out here
partytimehexcellent:

FEMICOM is a side-project that I quietly released on Friday. Thanks to prostheticknowledge and other folks on tumblr and twitter who have been sharing the site with others. I’m very happy and humbled that the idea behind this project resonates.
prostheticknowledge:

FEMICOM 
New online resource project by Part Time! Hexcellent! [Tumblr Blog] that looks at the female characters that have appeared in the history of video games:

Though the FEMICOM site itself is quite new—(cue the advance apology for any broken links)—the idea behind it has been dear to me for quite some time. As a child of the 1990s, much of my play time was spent with that generation of video games and computers, whether at the mall’s arcade, in the school’s computer lab with its neat array of Macintoshes, or at cousins’ or friends’ houses where we marveled at the amazing graphics of Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and DOOM. And aside from my early obsession with baseball and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, I was also a girly-girl through and through, happy to play with Barbies and fairly insistent on wearing dresses at all times. As I grew older, I found that video game culture and girly culture rarely intersected. Yet, happily, there were places where the two worlds overlapped; these were my favorite play spaces in my teens and beyond.
FEMICOM is a portmanteau that combines the words feminine and computing. It is also a nod to the Japanese video game console called the Nintendo Famicom. FEMICOM is my attempt to document and preserve those special pockets of feminine tech, especially of the 20th century. Tamagotchis and Hello Kitty Game Boys are part of this space, as are web sozai, webrings, software skins, and electronic paper dolls, to name a few. By bringing these electronic artifacts together in a central archive, I hope to encourage comparisons among them and to ask and answer questions about stereotypical gender roles and how they have come to shape modern games and computing experiences. FEMICOM will catalog these items, which are often missing from other video game and software databases, so that they can be easily browsed or searched. Additionally, the site will feature game development resources, interviews, and other relevant content. 

[Bold is my emphasis] 
As I have said earlier, the site is in the early stages of content development, but you can check out here

Reblogged from partytimehexcellent (Originally from prostheticknowledge)

partytimehexcellent:

FEMICOM is a side-project that I quietly released on Friday. Thanks to prostheticknowledge and other folks on tumblr and twitter who have been sharing the site with others. I’m very happy and humbled that the idea behind this project resonates.

prostheticknowledge:

FEMICOM 

New online resource project by Part Time! Hexcellent! [Tumblr Blog] that looks at the female characters that have appeared in the history of video games:

Though the FEMICOM site itself is quite new—(cue the advance apology for any broken links)—the idea behind it has been dear to me for quite some time. As a child of the 1990s, much of my play time was spent with that generation of video games and computers, whether at the mall’s arcade, in the school’s computer lab with its neat array of Macintoshes, or at cousins’ or friends’ houses where we marveled at the amazing graphics of Sonic the Hedgehog 2 and DOOM. And aside from my early obsession with baseball and Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, I was also a girly-girl through and through, happy to play with Barbies and fairly insistent on wearing dresses at all times. As I grew older, I found that video game culture and girly culture rarely intersected. Yet, happily, there were places where the two worlds overlapped; these were my favorite play spaces in my teens and beyond.

FEMICOM is a portmanteau that combines the words feminine and computing. It is also a nod to the Japanese video game console called the Nintendo Famicom. FEMICOM is my attempt to document and preserve those special pockets of feminine tech, especially of the 20th century. Tamagotchis and Hello Kitty Game Boys are part of this space, as are web sozai, webrings, software skins, and electronic paper dolls, to name a few. By bringing these electronic artifacts together in a central archive, I hope to encourage comparisons among them and to ask and answer questions about stereotypical gender roles and how they have come to shape modern games and computing experiences. FEMICOM will catalog these items, which are often missing from other video game and software databases, so that they can be easily browsed or searched. Additionally, the site will feature game development resources, interviews, and other relevant content. 

[Bold is my emphasis] 

As I have said earlier, the site is in the early stages of content development, but you can check out here


NOTES

  1. sinyocastle reblogged this from partytimehexcellent
  2. kingof0kay reblogged this from prostheticknowledge
  3. chiaruscuru reblogged this from gamefreaksnz and added:
    SAILOR MOON!
  4. missingrache reblogged this from varietyshow
  5. fondofit reblogged this from varietyshow and added:
    This is pretty damn awesome.
  6. varietyshow reblogged this from funismajin
  7. kabopple reblogged this from prostheticknowledge and added:
    I still contend that that Sailor Moon Game is one of the best SNES games =P
  8. funismajin reblogged this from scanmagic
  9. scanmagic reblogged this from restinpeaches and added:
    okay you know how we do it here at scanmagic but you know sometimes you come across cool things and you want to share...
  10. mandafandom reblogged this from prostheticknowledge
  11. juakianako reblogged this from prostheticknowledge
  12. st-ranglehold reblogged this from prostheticknowledge
  13. wanderingdj reblogged this from prostheticknowledge
  14. nelwyn reblogged this from prostheticknowledge
  15. jigsawbzerk reblogged this from gamefreaksnz
  16. lspismybff reblogged this from gamefreaksnz
  17. lunarpunishment reblogged this from gamefreaksnz
  18. nekrotic reblogged this from gamefreaksnz
  19. mrghosty reblogged this from partytimehexcellent